Aeroplane Smurf

This week Brussels Airlines announced that The Smurfs would become their 5th Belgian icon to be displayed on their new A320 aircraft due to be launched in March 2018.  Upon hearing this news, I decided to explore Aeroplane Super Smurf first released by Schleich in 1982 right through to 1999. 

If you are the kind of collector who tries to buy pieces to complete their Super Smurf, for example Aeroplane be mindful that the parts are different  in the Hong Kong and German versions. The most notable difference between the two is to do with the red wings as they have a different connection to the hull of the aeroplane. The Aeroplane can also be a little fragile so it is not something that I would recommend pulling apart.

The Aeroplane Super Smurf can be found with a pilot smurf wearing googles and a red scarf while flying a grey/silver aeroplane with red wings, with a spinning yellow propeller. 

The German version can be found with or without markings on the hull of the aeroplane – W.Germany Schleich S © Peyo 1981. The German version of the aeroplane is a lighter grey colour and has slightly thinner red wings compared to the Hong Kong ones. The Pilot Smurf can also be found with different paint dots, mustard and red indicating that it was painted in Portugal and Sri Lanka. There is also a version with a Ce mark that I don’t yet have.

I have 2 versions of the Hong Kong made planes and smurfs, one with W. Berrie and one without. Both markings can be found on the smurf and on the hull of the aeroplane. Wallace Berrie sold Aeroplane only for two years, 1983 and 1984 in the USA and I am unsure if BP Australia ever sold the Aeroplane Super Smurf. The Hong Kong aeroplanes are a much darker grey almost silver like colour and typically the yellow colour is different between the propeller and wheels. My bet is that they used the same yellow wheels as used on the Car Driver Super Smurf. 

There is a lot to like about Aeroplane no matter what age you are. For kids who like to play with their smurfs or for collectors who like to display their smurfs. So up in the air with Aeroplane Smurf!

Keep on Smurfin

Kath B

 

 

Deceptive Super Smurf Boxes

Back in the day when Schleich first started producing Super Smurfs something unthinkable was happening. Some called it deceptive others called it misleading. So how would you respond if you just brought yourself a Super Smurf only to find it isn’t the same as what was shown on the box.

Between 1978 to around 1983 Schleich produced a box with Super Schlumpf!! printed on the box in black bold letters. All Super Smurfs from 40201 Bobsled to 40232 Log Car can be found with this style of box. Upon looking at the picture of the Super Smurf on the box to the actual Super Smurf inside the box, it was quite surprising how many differences could be found. Allow me to give you some examples:

Skier – pictured with green skies on the box and actually came with silver skies.

Car Driver – pictured with a gold steering wheel on red car and actually came with a yellow steering wheel.

Fencer – pictured with yellow foil guards and actually  came with golden foil guards.

Lawnmower – pictured with a brown lawnmower and actually came with a yellow bladed lawnmower.

Fireman – pictured with a silver helmet and actually came with a light blue/grey helmet

Cyclist – pictured with black tyres with white spokes and actually came with grey tyres with white spokes. 

Both in the UK and the US the same pictures were being used on their prospective boxes between 1979 to 1983. I would have thought that Wallace Berrie would have used their own pictures considering their smurfs were being made in Hong Kong and quite often painted with different colours than their European counterparts.

Between 1983 to 1991 Schleich changed the details on the box to Super Schlumpf Smurf!! It was displaying details in German, English and French but in most cases the pictures were not changed.

To be honest I was quite amazed that there was not more fuss about this at the time. Maybe there was, I just could not find anything substanal. It definitely keeps us poor collectors on our toes.

Keep on Smurfin

Kath B

 

 

Identify your Smurf

Everyone discovers a smurf sooner or later that is hard to identify. Where does one go to? A good catalogue guide is always helpful, and are well worth buying. The amount of times I have referred back to them is worth the cost. The disadvantage of books in most cases they tend to only display items that were produced by the major manufacturers; e.g Schleich, Bully, Plastoy etc

There are also number smurf collections online whose owners are very passionate about their smurfs. However keep in mind don’t trust everything you read on the internet, as anyone can post something online. However researching online also has some advantages as if you are not sure what keyword to search for, use resources such as Google Images. Think about how one would describe a smurf. Don’t just type in smurf or blue, think about what is the smurf doing; e.g playing football or an instrument. 

About a year ago I came across a weird looking Smurfette that had no markings but was made out of pvc material like the Schleich ones. It was also slightly larger in size and had plug like things on the back of her head. I took some photographs and asked the question on the Blue Cavern Forum but had no response.  I placed this Smurfette with my collection of fake smurfs until I could identify her.

Then one afternoon I came across a smurf collection someone was selling online. It is fair to say that the collection of smurfs had seen better days as a large number of smurfs were either covered in grim, missing accessories or the blue paint had worn away. Upon closer inspection of the collection was a yellow plastic flute which had a smurf and smurfette attached to it. This was the same as my Smurfette! 

The flute had the markings © Peyo BP Australia 80 Made in Hong Kong and measured about 20cm long. Like any old toy it had quite few scratches and marks but the two smurfs looked like they were in pretty good condition.

If you find a smurf that you are having problems with identifying, just send me a picture along with any information you may have and I will see what I can find. The satisfaction of identifying something especially a smurf can be really satisfying and keeps you on your toes. As they say you never stop learning.

Keep on Smurfin

Kath B 

Super Smurf Bobsled

Spring is finally here, so now it is time to sort ones smurf collection. So I thought I would start with Super Smurf Bobsled, #40201. For people new to collecting smurfs, a Super Smurf is a smurf figurine with an accessory and should come in it’s own individual box.

Bobsled was first released in 1978 by Schleich. In 1978 there were six Super Smurfs released by Schleich. These also included Chimney Sweep #40202, Tricycle #40203, Skateboarder #40204, Skier #40205 and Gardener #40206. It should also be noted that Bully never produced Super Smurfs. 

In Der Schlumpf Katalog IV and Gian & Davi Collezioni – The Smurfs Official Collector’s Guide it tells us that Bobsled was available from 1978 to 1993. In Gian & Davi Collezioni – The Smurfs Official Collector’s Guide it also tells which boxes are to be found. This is really useful as I have five Bobsled Smurfs but only one came in a box.

I don’t have the first one Schleich released. This one has no eyebrows or any markings. I think there is a cavity number on the smurf. 

The early Bobsled smurf has the markings W.Germany Schleich emblem © Peyo (signature style) on it’s stomach. The scarf is orange red like colour and the bobsled is generally a dark yellow colour and has the markings W.Germany Schleich emblem © Peyo (signature style)

I also have one with a yellow scarf with the same markings and also has a mustard paint dot under one of the feet. The bobsled is a dark yellow colour and has same markings as before. This yellow scarf was especially made for the UK market. 

There is also a Bobsled Smurf with the markings W.Germany Schleich S © Peyo which I don’t have.  Perhaps this version was the one that was sold in the USA by Wallace Berrie between 1982 to 1984. But to be honest I am not really sure, I just know they never made a Bobsled Super Smurf in Hong Kong. 

The most recent Bobsled smurf has bright shiny colours and a lemon yellow bobsled. The markings Schleich S © Peyo 1978 can be found on the smurf’s stomach and also on the bobsled.  

The good thing about the Bobsled Super Smurf is that it is still easy to find today and in some cases still with it’s original box. 

Keep on Smurfin

Kath B